Teaching

Southwestern Oklahoma State University – Assistant Professor of English

As an Assistant Professor of English at SWOSU, I have the privilege to work with a variety of students, from freshmen to seniors, in courses covering first-year composition and digital writing, as well as remedial writing.

For more information on my pedagogy, click here. Sample syllabi from courses can be accessed in the sidebar, or by clicking the links below:

(page in progress)

Engl 1113 Freshman Composition I
In this general education course, students were trained in effective communicative skills with emphasis on writing as required for successful college study. The course explored how our world is rhetorical in all sorts of ways and asked students to develop their ability to read and think carefully, while also considering the steps necessary to compose clear and coherent writing. Course units included Computer Literacy, Visual Rhetoric, Analysis vs. Synthesis, Digital Research Methods, and the Art of Public Scholarship.
Fall 2019, Fall 2020

Engl 1213 Freshman Composition II
As the second required writing general education course, this class focused on advanced-level composition, asking students to consider the more mature and specific rhetorical tactics writers may use to develop and support claims in all sorts of academic and professional fields. Course units included Academic Writing Across the Disciplines, Digital Research Methods, Effective Argumentation, and the Art of Public Scholarship.
Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020

Engl 4653 Writing for Multimedia
Writing for Multimedia is an interactive course designed to give students practice producing texts for a wide range of media for a variety of purposes – entertainment, gaming, marketing, education. Students will learn to write, think and edit using multiple modes of composition, as well as how to engage effectively, respectfully and safely in/with digital spaces. This course looks at the ways in which we create and consume all sorts of texts in their various forms—particularly digital ones. What changes when our rhetorics become digital? What new possibilities emerge for writing itself in a digital context—what new modes of representation and expression? How do we need to think differently in order to read and write within the digital? We’ll take up these and other questions as we read, write, and practice composition in digital spaces.
Spring 2020

Engl 0123 Composition I Support (long term substitute)
A developmental course in English designed to provide remedial students an opportunity to increase their writing skills. Emphasis is placed on sentence construction, paragraph organization, sound thesis statements, and adequate support for them. The course is designed to supplement the ENGL 1113 curriculum in a manner that promotes student success there.
Spring 2020

Louisiana State University – Graduate Teaching Assistant

As an English graduate student at Louisiana State University with a teaching assistantship, I had the privilege to work with a variety of LSU students, from freshmen to seniors, in courses covering both English composition and literary studies.

ENGL 2000: Sophomore Composition, “Why Video Games Matter: Identity, Representation and Community”
Service-Learning Community Partner: AbleGamers Charity
To learn more about this course and its service-learning component, see the course page by clicking here. Additionally, you can read more about the structure of this course by reading the chapter “Writing to Gaming Audiences: A Case Study” in the forthcoming Playing with the Rules: The Ethics of Playing, Researching, and Teaching Games in the Writing Classroom.
Taught Spring 2018

ENGL 1001: Freshmen Composition, “The American Dream”
Taught Fall 2017

ENGL 2123: Literary Traditions and Themes, “Videogames & Literature”
To see the conference presentation about my experience teaching this course titled “Teaching Through Game Design” given at the College English Association’s 50th Annual Conference by clicking here.
Taught Spring 2017

ENGL 1001: Freshmen Composition, “Digital Citizenship”
Taught Fall 2016

ENGL 2000: Sophomore Composition, “Utopias and Dystopias: Writing for Our Future”
To see the conference presentation about my experience teaching this course titled “Getting Real: Using a Utopian/Dystopian Framework in the Composition Classroom” given at SAMLA 88 by clicking here.
Taught Spring 2016

ENGL 1001: Freshmen Composition
Taught Fall 2015

 

Proposed Future Courses

ENGL 7981: Topics in Modern and Contemporary Literature, “Literature in the Digital Age”
Course Description: In this new millennium, words are constantly juxtaposed against images, videos, and sounds across a global network through which people have access to more text than ever before. What does it mean to read and write literature in this moment? What new possibilities emerge for writing itself in a digital context—what new modes of representation and expression? How do we as readers need to think differently in order to read within the digital? We’ll take up these and other epistemological and methodological questions as we consider how contemporary authors represent, respond to, and employ digital technology in their writing. Along with relevant scholarship, we will explore a wide range of genres and medial formats, including experimental works that push at the boundaries of the page in an attempt to rethink print literature alongside the digital, as well as literature that is born digital, such as electronic literature, hypertexts, and digital games.